January 2021

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The Dynamic Workplace Concept Is Changing How We Think — And Talk About — Office Culture

The Dynamic Workplace Concept Is Changing How We Think — And Talk About — Office Culture

2020 exposed significant cracks in the foundation of the modern workplace: the open office concept. As Christopher Mims writes in a recent editorial for The Wall Street Journal, “[c]ramming cavernous spaces with as many desks as they could hold might have increased serendipitous interactions, but it almost certainly reduced productivity and helped spread communicable diseases, including coronavirus.”

Entering 2021, business leaders have little choice but to address these structural issues. Otherwise, as Mims notes, their offices risk turning into “ghost towns.” 2020 proved that collaboration can happen by virtual means and introduced many to the perks of working from home. And, as it turns out, being free to work in one’s pajamas can be more incentivizing than access to an Xbox-stuffed gaming room.

Mims offers a fairly blunt assessment of the task now facing architects and designers. Floor plans and furnishings that promise to “improve the office-work status quo” are no longer enough. Instead, he says, businesses must create working environments that “convince people to even bother showing up.”  

For that reason, the office of the future is looking more and more like the dynamic workplace.

Co-Design: GL Seaman & Company Pairs Advanced Technology and Human Expertise to Meet Today’s — and Tomorrow’s — Office Space Planning Challenges

Co-Design: GL Seaman & Company Pairs Advanced Technology and Human Expertise to Meet Today’s — and Tomorrow’s — Office Space Planning Challenges

Now more than eight months into an extended experiment in working from home, many employees have developed a new appreciation for “the office” — both the space itself and the unique culture it can nurture. As Robin Rucker, GL Seaman’s Vice President - Client Engagement & Workplace Strategy, observes: “We’re probably never going to work in a siloed, ‘heads-down’ manner again. Now that they’ve had to face the unprecedented challenges that come with operating through a pandemic, businesses understand better than ever how critical collaboration is to problem-solving, innovation, and change management.”

To support that collaboration, Robin adds, businesses need to invest in “fluid spaces.” Since the onset of the pandemic, GL Seaman’s designers have been deploying a new, multi-faceted solution to creating such spaces: Co-Design.